Collection Spotlight: Recent Acquisitions by Black Artists

Collection Spotlight: Recent Acquisitions by Black Artists

Event Start Date: April 9, 2021
Event End Date: April 9, 2021
Event Start Time: 10:00 AM
Event End Time: 5:00 PM
Venue: LSU Museum of Art
Event Location: 100 Lafayette St
City: Baton Rouge

Details

On view March 28–September 26 LSU MOA will be opening a special permanent collection exhibition spotlighting recent acquisitions by Black artists including works by Radcliffe Bailey, Whitfield Lovell, Madelyn Sneed-Grays, Mario Moore, and Gordon Parks, among other recently acquired works. These acquisitions were made possible by The Winifred and Kevin P. Reilly Initiative for Underrepresented Artists which supports growth of LSU MOA's permanent collection by funding acquisitions of works by Black, Indigenous, and Latinx artists, including those of marginalized sexualities, gender identities, and communities. All LSU MOA exhibitions are also supported by the generous donors to the LSU MOA Annual Exhibition Fund. Collection Spotlight: Recent Acquisitions by Black Artists opens March 28 at LSU Museum of Art March 09, 2021 in MOA in the news, Exhibition LSU Museum of Art (LSU MOA) in Baton Rouge, LA is pleased to open a special permanent collection exhibition spotlighting recent acquisitions of works by Black artists on March 28. On view for the first time at LSU MOA will be works by Radcliffe Bailey, Whitfield Lovell, Madelyn Sneed-Grays, Mario Moore, and Gordon Parks, among other recently acquired works. One work featured is a self-portrait titled Two Strikes by artist Madelyn Sneed-Grays. Sneed-Grays created this work in response to rarely seeing herself in artistic spaces. “Do you know what that means when a human being has two strikes? Well, let me inform you. I am black and I am a woman. Studies show that women make up just 2% of the art market and that, “artists in 18 major U.S. museums are 85% white and 87% male.” The fact that I rarely saw myself in artistic spaces that were, and still are, predominantly white is what fueled my perfectionistic ways to make certain I represent for my culture. This is what made me realize growing up, that 100% wasn’t enough and 110% was imperative. This is what made me how I am. I am black and I am a woman.” Other works include Cada Dia